La Femme

Art In Life: My 5 Winning Looks From The Meta Gala 2018

There’s a magical moment that descends upon us annually. Lights are shining. There is a party to be had. And from what we know there is wonderment and merriment for those who celebrate. It is as the tale goes, “The most wonderful time of the year” but unlike the Christmas season the carol traditionally refers to for the fashion enthusiasts amongst us it is the Met Gala.

Ahhh the Met Gala, a night where fashion returns to its core – pure art. However, this night of nights is not without controversy and 2018’s theme Heavenly Bodies- Fashion and the Catholic Imagination garnered said criticism. With that said 2018’s theme proved my all time favourite as a result of the creativity that was unleashed, the boundaries pushed and the discussions raised as a result of the theme.

For many, I can understand how a judeo Christian centric Met Gala might be deemed as offensive or parodying faith. The truth is fashion gets a bad rap of baring no significance to culture so when it makes a statement it can be easily perceived as inconsequential or disingenuous. However, I implore you to take a deeper look at the craftsmanship, imagination and stories being constructed with a simple needle and thread. Catholicism and art have long been rooted together in a state of co-dependence. In the past where literacy was not common place the church relied on art to bring scripture to life and to convey meaning. Equally so artists were dependent on the church and without this union there would be no Raphael, Michelangelo or Da Vinci as we know them today.

Fashion is art and the Met Gala which marks the opening of the Costume Institute’s annual fashion exhibit is a celebration of said art. Themes are chosen not in the name of mockery. They are chosen in the name of meaning.

B L A K E L I V E L Y

Atelier Versace & Lorraine Schwartz

What I adore about Blake Lively wearing Atelier Versace is that the rich palette, gold detailing and sleek bodice speaks to the Versace we all know and love . That distinct and iconic style that is bold, glamourous and empowering. In relation to theme, having had the privilege of standing before the works of art that adorn the Vatican I feel this look pays homage to the Throne of Saint Peter. It perfectly captures it decadence and magnificence creating nothing short of majestic.

Z E N D A Y A

Atelier Versace

A night celebrating the Catholic Imagination would not be complete without drawing inspiration from the story of Joan of Arc, the ultimate female icon, warrior of France and defender of faith. Canonised as a Roman Catholic saint she is celebrated through Atelier Versace and thus brings her story to a new generation via Zendaya.

P R I Y A N K A C H O P R A

Ralph Lauren

Embodying The Madonna, Ralph Lauren’s classic design spirt is captured in the simplicity of the dress whilst capturing all that is demure and modest by covering the hair and shoulders commonly seen in depictions of Mary. When I look at the richness of the colours, jewels and fabric chosen I can’t help but see Botticelli’s work , namely the Bardi Altarpiece come to life for one night only in New York City.

S Z A

Versace & Djula

With many designs of the evening illustrating the “Catholic Imagination,” SZA for Versace is the symbol of “Heavenly Bodies.” Looking like an angel amongst us there is a calmness and quiet strength to this creation. I can’t help put wonder if inspiration was drawn from William Adolphe Bouguereau’s Virgin Mary and Angels Playing which evoke similar feelings of comfort for the viewer.

K A T E B O S W O R T H

Oscar De La Renta

Purity and etherealness it all its forms, Kate Bosworth for Oscar De La Renta looks as though she was painted by William-Adolphe Bouguereau or the very least his muse for L’Innocence. Renowned for his feminine collections this creation is the perfect combination of costume, couture and craft.

*Disclaimer: all photography belong to Getty Images sourced via Vogue*